Community Profile, Clayton, New Mexico

Clayton New Mexico is central to the Ports to Plains traffic and commerce highway program. The Ports to Plains coalition of communities is working collectively and actively to promote industry and development along the North-South Corridor of highways from Laredo Texas, Mexico to the oil sands of Calgary Canada. The Ports to Plains initiative involves improving the highways along this corridor by increasing lanes for heavy commerce. The heartland of the United States in terms of Agriculture and alternative energy is traversed by the Ports to Plains highway project. Clayton New Mexico falls right in the middle of that project. We are central to I-25 running north, I-40 running east and west. We fall on the crossroads of highways 87 and 56 with direct access to I-40 and I-25.

Our town is quaint and business friendly with many environmental wonders. Although we are rural and agricultural in nature, we are poised for economic development in wind, solar and biofuels. We have a planned industrial park of over 1200 acres available for production, storage facilities, or perhaps being an intermediary in assembly and shipping. The town has 2500 residents, but being so centrally located in the shipping and transportation business, is bustling. Our Historic “Old West’ Style and warmth draws both young and old to our local. Local tourist locations abound. Fishing and hunting are excellent. We are just far enough from metropolitan centers to be quaint, but just close enough for international travel and larger scale shopping , if required. Clayton New Mexico was voted the Number One Location in New Mexico to raise a family by NerdWallet® .This recommendation considered climate, cost of living, crime, school ACT scores, and availability of activities.

Location

ClaytonMap

Clayton is located in the Northeastern Corner of New Mexico, about 80 miles south of the Colorado border, 12 miles from the Oklahoma Panhandle and 10 Miles from the Texas panhandle, and only 100 miles from Kansas,  located strategically in the “5 States” area. (Texas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Kansas and Colorado)

Provide a chart of mileage to major cities/markets

Albuquerque NM 272
Amarillo Tx 120
Denver    Co 301
Colorado Springs CO 231
Dallas TX 497
Kansas City   Ka 557
Oklahoma City    OK 395

 

Population Data: (According to 2010 Census)

  • Community : 2150
  • County: 4549
  • MSA (if your community is part of a MSA)
  • Community and county population by:
Age group with median age: 36.9 years
Gender: 49.2% male, 50.8 female

Race and ethnicity:

 
White 67
Black 7.5
American Indian or Alaskan Native 3.9
Asian 0.0
Native Islander, Hawaiian 0.0
Hispanic or Latino 53.2

 

Socio-economic data:

Per capita personal income: $17,188
Effective buying income  (household income) $34,976

Housing occupancy and vacancy  

 
Owner occupied housing units 68.9%
Renter Occupied housing units  31.1 %
Vacant Housing Units 25.5%

 

  • Owner occupied housing units   
  • Renter Occupied housing units  
  • Vacant Housing Units                

Labor Force:

The labor force of Clayton actually could involve 5 states, Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, Union County and Texas Panhandle. A 60 mile (1 hour commute) would put you into any one of the 5 states. We (Clayton and Union County)  have a low unemployment rate (around 3%), but still have access to many interested  workers in the 5 states surrounding area.


Total – employed and unemployed (compared with state – DWS) 1669

  • Labor force participation  (Census)110 unemployed 1559 employed

By age group (Census)

 16-19 years 51.4% unemployed
 20-24 years 10.1% unemployed
 25-44 years 2.3% unemployed
 45-54 years 6.6% unemployed
55-64 years 6.3% unemployed
65-74 years 85% unemployed
75 and over 85% unemployed

 

Employment by industry with average or median wages (DWS-QCEW data)

Agricultural, forestry, fishing, hunting, mining 23,000
Construction 23,300
Manufacturing 73, 043
Wholesale trade 31, 667
Retail trade 17,930
Transportation, warehousing and Utilities 43,958
Utilities 42,917
Finance, Insurance, Real estate and rental 19,922
Real estate Rental and Leasing 18,984
Educational and Health Care and Social Services 38,333
Health care and social assistance 39, 306
Arts, entertainment and recreation, accommodation and food 27, 031
Public Administration 26,250

Employment by occupation with average or median wages (DWS)

Management, professional and related occupations 33, 000
Management Business and Financial occupations 34, 688
Management Occupations 32,241
Business and Financial Operations 46, 458
Professional and related occupations 27, 000
Community and social services 27, 250
Education, Training and Library 16,979
Healthcare practitioner and technical 33, 542
Health Diagnosing and treating practitioners and other technical 17,083
Health Technologists and Technicians 33,750
Health care support 2,596
Protective Services 27,308
Fire Fighting, prevention 25,156
Law enforcement 36,806
Food preparation 18, 977
Building and Grounds 14, 219
Personal Care and Service 30,662
Sales and Office 19,886
Sales and Related 20,795
Office and administration 19,265
Farming, Fishing, Forestry 6938
Construction 20,833
Construction and extraction 23,224
Installation, maintenance and repair 19,258
Production, Transportation and Material moving 20,625
Production occupations 73,261
Supervisions, transportation and materials moving 11, 944
Motor vehicle operators 26875
Material moving workers 9213

 

  • Languages spoken and taught  English and Spanish
  • Top 10-20 private sector employers  Hospital, School System, County, GEO Group (Prison), City workers, Restaurants, Hotels, Small Business, Construction,
  • Average wage per job (BEA)  Per capita personal income 2009  : $31,378,  Union County 2009 ranked 12th in state

 

Educational Attainment:

  • High school graduates (number and percent) 37 students , 94.1% Graduation Rate (2010)  79.4% of the community 25 years and older have high school diploma
  • Two-year college graduates (number and percent)
  • 4-year college graduates (number and percent)  12.2 % of the community 25 years and old have bachelors degree
  • Graduate and professional degrees (number and percent)  5.1% of the community 25 or older have graduate or professional degree
  • SAT/ACT scores and drop-out rate 2.82% drop out rate (2010)

Educational attainment data is provided by the Census Bureau (last bullet from local school district)

Education:

The Clayton School System is the largest district I school system in the county .The Clayton 
School system is the only school district with subgroups in the state in which every campus made AYP. 87% of schools did not make AYP. Our school system has strong ties with Mesa lands community college and college level courses are offered to the high school students. Many students graduate from Clayton High School with 20-30 college credits. Clayton High School has an  excellent and widely recognized wood working program with award winning projects of incredible workmanship produced every year both male and female students.

Clayton School system is one of three double AA schools in the state in which the band won the state equivalent at three different levels. Clayton High school is recognized by US and News and World Report to be in the top 8% of schools in the Nation. (Based on ACT scores, Dual enrollment, and other special educational criteria). Our campus is specialized because it is the largest WPA museum in the nation.

Health Care:

Union County General Hospital is a community hospital with about 30 beds. A recent 9 million dollar renovation brought CT scanning, Nuclear Imaging, Ultrasound and expanded X ray capacity to the area. The physicians practice general medicine, and OB. We have a full time surgeon available as well. The health care facilities are excellent, with the ability to refer to Amarillo by chopper if required.

Transportation:

  • Local airport (with FBO and all available services) and closest airport with commercial service (list commercial carriers with non-stop service and cargo/freight carriers)  
  • Clayton Municipal Airport and Airpark, municipal and commercial airport. Runway 2/20 4810 feet long 75 feet wide, recently relined, night lights, asphalt. Runway 12/30 4100 feet long, 60 feet wide, paved asphalt, relined and night lighting.  Adjacent land around runway 755 acres.
  • Closest commercial airport Amarillo Texas 120 miles away. Commercial, cargo, freight and International flights. Commercial Carriers: Delta, United, Southwest, Continental.
  • Rail service availability in region
  • BNSF travels through Clayton, but does not stop. We do have an existing rail spur into Clayton which is not activated at the current time.
  • Highways – both interstate and regional
  • 87/64 double lined out of Texas, north to Raton. I-25 out of Raton. 56 West to Springer, NM to also pick up (I-25 at Springer) 54 South picks up I-40 at Nara Visa New Mexico
  • Distance to port of entry (with services) if applicable
  • Port of Entry in Clayton New Mexico with 87/64 entering from Texas

 

Utilities (list providers with capacity and cost information):

Electricity
PNM Provides Electrical in Clayton New Mexico.
Southwestern Electric Provides Electrical outside of town limits to the county.
PMN and Southwest Share a 20MW substation located in Clapham NM.


PNM Rates:
Residential: First 450 kWh per Month $0.0906237/kWh $00906237/kWh x
Next 450 kWh per Month $0.1373455/kWh $0.1 185101/kWh X
All Additional kWh per Month $01576960/kWh $01283520/kWh

Water : Provided locally in town by the Town of Clayton
Wastewater Treatment : Provided locally in town by the Town of Clayton
Solid waste disposal: Provided locally in town by the Town of Clayton
Natural gas: Provided by Gas Co of New Mexico in Clayton Municipality. Natural gas provided by Arthur Propone outside of City Limits.
Telecommunications (include broadband availability and level): ENMR Telecommunications Cooperative with Broadband High Baud Rate Fiber optic Cable going in presently. Able to support upload and download speeds of up to 1 gigabyte/sec. Most plans run 20-100megabytes/sec.  Since ENMR is the cellular carrier for the broad rural area of Northeastern New Mexico, one will fine coverage in some of the remotest parts of New Mexico (for instance the Bell Ranch) where no other coverage is available. Plateau Cellular has many towers located in very remote places to cover the farm and ranch communities.

Housing

Availability and cost range: Presently stable real estate market. Plenty of inventory of homes for sale on the market with a high of $299,000 for Victorian Home to a low $35,000 for 2B/1B home. Median Housing purchase price would be $79,000. Rental Shortage at present time could use more rental inventory to meet rental demand. Most in demand is 3B/2B rentals. Average rental price reasonable at $550 for a 3B/1B or $650 for 3B/2B

Government

The Clayton Municipal government is a Mayor-Council-Manager form of government.  All of the positions are non-partisan and are elected at large, with each having a four year term.  Appointed officials at the city are the manager, clerk, and police chief.  The treasurer is treated as an employee.  The city has three departments, street, water, and sewer.  The city also runs the Senior Citizens’ center and the library.

Union County has three commissioners, each elected at large.  These positions are partisan and the candidate must go through the primary/general election process.  The three commissioners then elect a Chairman to conduct meetings.  The Chairmanship is up every two years to correspond with the election of new Commissioners.  The Commissioners appoint a County Manager and a Road Superintendent.  


The County Manager oversees daily County operations such as payroll, accounts receivable & payable, hospital indigent, as well as setting meeting agendas and prepping for monthly meetings.

The Road Superintendent has the responsibility for all County roads and has charge of all road department employees, equipment, and E-911 Mapper.

The County Clerk, Treasurer, Assessor, Sheriff, & Magistrate Judge are all independently elected and run their own offices.  They are responsible for creating their own budgets, but must get the budgets approved by the County Commissioners.

Taxes

Local GRT: Clayton 7.8750, Des Moines 7.5000, Folsom 7.500, Grenville 7.5000, Remainder of the County: 6.0625

Property taxes
(State taxes and credits will be linked to community profiles)

Union County Property Tax Information

 Union County Property Tax Information
 Median Property Tax  Percentage Of Income Percentage Of Property Value 
$377 ± 38 (2569th of 3145) 0.92 ± 0.12% (2573rd of 3145) 0.42 ± 0.08% (2623rd of 3145)

 

The median property tax in Union County, New Mexico is $377 per year for a home worth the median value of $89,700. Union County collects, on average, 0.42% of a property's estimated fair market value as property tax.

Union County has one of the lowest median property tax rates in the country, with only two thousand five hundred sixty nine of the 3145 counties collecting a lower property tax then Union County.

The average yearly property tax paid by Union County residents amounts to about 0.92% of their yearly income. Union County is ranked 2573rd of the 3145 counties for property taxes as a percentage of median income.

Union County has passed LEDA Ordinance #30
Clayton has passed a Local Economic Development Ordinance (632)
IRB’s were used to Finance the Municipally owned, GEO operative prison construction
And could be passed for other large scale projects as well .
Property Taxes for Business operation are quite reasonable.

 

By Age Group (Census)

16-19 years 51.4% unemployed
20-24 years 10.1% unemployed
25-44 years 2.3% unemployed
45-54 years 6.6% unemployed
55-64 years 6.3% unemployed
65-74 years 85% unemployed
75 and over 85% unemploy

 

Employment by industry with average or median wages (DWS-QCEW data)

Agricultural, forestry, fishing, hunting, mining 23,000
Construction 23,300
Manufacturing 73, 043
Wholesale trade 31, 667
trade 17,930
Transportation, warehousing and Utilities 43,958
Utilities 42,917
Finance, Insurance, Real estate and rental 19,922
Real estate Rental and Leasing 18,984
Educational and Health Care and Social Services 38,333
Health care and social assistance 39, 306
Arts, entertainment and recreation, accommodation and food 27, 031
Public Administration 26,250
   

Employment by occupation with average or median wages (DWS)

 
   
Management, professional and related occupations 33, 000
Management Business and Financial occupations 34, 688
Management Occupations 32,241
Business and Financial Operations 46, 458
Professional and related occupations 27, 000
Community and social services 27, 250
Education, Training and Library 16,979
Healthcare practitioner and technical 33, 542
Health Diagnosing and treating practitioners and other technical 17083
Health Technologists and Technicians 33,750
Health care support 2596
Protective Services 27308
Fire Fighting, prevention 25,156
Law enforcement 36,806
Food preparation 18, 977
Building and Grounds 14, 219
Personal Care and Service 30,662
Sales and Office 19,886
Sales and Related 20,795
Office and administration 19,265
Farming, Fishing, Forestry 6938
Construction 20,833
Construction and extraction 23224
Installation, maintenance and repair 19,258
Production, Transportation and Material moving 20,625
Production occupations 73,261
Supervisions, transportation and materials moving 11, 944
Motor vehicle operators 26875
Material moving workers 9213

 

Languages spoken and taught  English and Spanish

Top 10-20 private sector employers    Hospital, School System, County, GEO Group (Prison), City workers, Restaurants, Hotels, Small Business, Construction,
A new municipally owned Prison, leased to GEO (http://www.geogroup.com/locations_na.asp) which houses state (approx 620) prisoners. Approx 300 new jobs created.
Average wage per job (BEA)   Per capita personal income 2009  : $31,378,  Union County 2009 ranked 12th in state

Educational Attainment:

High school graduates (number and percent) 37 students , 94.1% Graduation Rate (2010)  79.4% of the community 25 years and older have high school diploma
Two-year college graduates (number and percent)
4-year college graduates (number and percent)  12.2 % of the community 25 years and old have bachelors degree
Graduate and professional degrees (number and percent)  5.1% of the community 25 or older have graduate or professional degree
SAT/ACT scores and drop-out rate 2.82% drop out rate (2010)

    # tested English Math Reading  
Science Aver          
2009 33 21.1 20.7 20.9 20.5 20.8

Educational attainment data is provided by the Census Bureau (last bullet from local school district)

Business Assistance

Provide information on all local business assistance programs, training, entrepreneurship mentoring, etc.

  • JTIP
  • NM Workforce Job Training Program
  • NM Small Business Center through Mesalands Community College


Local housing availability and costs (range): Presently stable real estate market.
Plenty of inventory of homes for sale on the market with a high of $299,000 for Victorian Home to a low $35,000 for 2B/1B home. Median Housing purchase price would be $79,000. Rental Shortage at present time, could use more rental inventory to meet rental demand. Most in demand is 3B/2B rentals. Average rental price reasonable at $550 for a 3B/1B or $650 for 3B/2B

Lifestyle

The small town atmosphere prevails here. We all know we live in close quarters together, so the cordial nature, the friendliness abounds. People from out of town cannot believe the warmth, friendliness and helpful nature of the Clayton population. The pace can be as slow or fast as you make it, but generally, people remain cordial, respectful and helpful. You cannot drive down the street without everyone waving and recognizing you. We are a rural community of Ranchers, Farmers, and outside working people, but also a very progressive, business minded community, looking to expand our horizons, take on new business and entrepreneurs for the progress of the community.

  • Outdoor recreation: Hunting (Antelope Hunting is world Renowned), Antelope, Deer, Elk, Geese, Turkey, Pheasant, Quail, Fishing, Camping, Hiking, Biking, Running
  • Fishing , Clayton Lake holds the NM Walleye record
  • Clayton Lake State Park:

www.emnrd.state.nm.us/PRD/Clayton.htm

Distance: 12 Miles

Contact: Charles Jordan

Hours of Operation: 24 Hours

Fees: $5 / per vehicle  Camping Fee: $8 - $14

Clayton Lake State Park is located 15 miles north of Clayton, close to New Mexico’s border with Colorado, Oklahoma and Texas. The landscape is characterized by rolling grasslands, volcanic rocks and sandstone bluffs. Set on the western edge of the Great Plains, it was a stopover point for travelers along the Cimarron Cutoff of the Santa Fe Trail. The park also features an astronomy observatory.  Visitors today can enjoy picnicking, camping, and superb fishing at the park’s 170-acre lake, as well as view one of the most extensive dinosaur trackways in North America.

The Park

Clayton Lake was created by the State Game and Fish Department in 1955 as a fishing lake and winter waterfowl resting area. A dam was constructed across Seneca Creek, which is actually a series of seeps except after heavy rains. During the fishing season, which usually runs from March to October each year, the lake is a popular spot for anglers hoping to catch trout, catfish, bass and walleye. Boats are allowed on the lake, but are restricted to trolling speeds. The lake is closed to fishing during the winter, when it serves as a stopover for waterfowl. Several duck species including mallards, pintails, and teals frequent the lake, and Canadian geese and bald eagles are often seen here.

The park offers camping and picnicking facilities, a group shelter, and a modern comfort station. The dinosaur tracks are located on the dam spillway, at the end of a gentle half mile trail. Best times to view the tracks are in the morning and late afternoon. A sheltered gazebo and boardwalk trail along the trackway provide extensive information regarding the dinosaurs that traveled here so long ago.

11th Annual Clayton Lake Trout Derby

The Annual Trout Derby at Clayton Lake draws nearly 1000 new people to town for the weekend , once per year. This Event is a fun-filled Family Event with camping and fishing at Clayton Lake.

You must have a valid New Mexico fishing license to fish at Clayton Lake State Park.  Licenses may be obtained at Knott's Sportsman Supply, 1015 South First St., Clayton, NM 88415.  They are open 5 days a week from 8 a.m. - 6 p.m. from Memorial Day through the end of October.  Closed on Sundays.  Winter hours are from 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.

You may also purchase a license online at www.wildlife.state.nm.us

 

Arts and Culture

Annual Clayton Arts Festival, the First Weekend in October. This very impressive annual event has over 60 great artists with some of the absolute best in NM and Texas Art. The festival has been going on for over 30 years. Annual Clayton Arts Festival
Over 400 fine paintings, food and entertainment, over 40 art & craft booths, pottery, quilts, toys, and jewelry. Concessions stand available. Held at the Clayton Civic Center. Free admission and parking. Call (575)374-9810 for more info.

The United Federated Women’s Art Council located on Mainstreet houses some of the State’s finest Art year round.

History and Museums

Herzstein Museum: A true treasure in Northeastern New Mexico, the Herzstein Memorial Museum will take you back in time.   When touring this museum, you will experience tracks of dinosaurs, tribulations of the Santa Fe Trail, hanging of outlaws, and the exquisite merchandise of long ago Jewish Merchants.  You will be astonished at the versatility of history on exhibit.   Displays include exotic items from Europe and the Orient as well as historical items used by local pioneers.  The church built in 1901 that houses the museum still has the original detailed stain glass windows and white cedar floors.  To complete your visit to New Mexico, this museum is a MUST SEE!

MusuemsChurchGlass

Events (art or music festivals, etc.)
1) Annual Viva New Mexico Music Festival the Third Saturday Night in July Downtown Clayton on Mainstreet outside in front of the Historic Eklund Hotel.
2) Annual Clayton Arts Council Arts Festival, first weekend in October
3) Annual Clayton Fishing Derby: Held early in Jun